In the News

...Because Alexa and Google Home and every other gewgaw that has the word “smart” in front of it, every service that has “personalized” in front of it is nothing but supply chain interfaces for the flow of raw material to be translated into data, to be fashioned into prediction products, to be sold in behavioral futures markets so that we end up funding our own domination...
Multiple contractors working for Microsoft explain how they listened to audio captured by Xbox consoles.

The former contractor said most of the voices they heard were of children.
Who's to blame for the IoT security problem: manufacturers creating devices, end user deploying them or governments not creating legislation enforcing security measures?
We’ve gotten used to trading personal information for tailored ads and letting devices into every part of our lives for convenience. But, as we develop these habits and make these trade-offs, what does it mean for our kids?
...Amazon wants to know every time the light is turned on or off, regardless of whether you asked Alexa to toggle the switch. Televisions must report the channel they’re set to. Smart locks must keep the company apprised whether or not the front door bolt is engaged.
But life inside the home, too, is increasingly transparent to watchful outsiders, the result of mushrooming internet-connected devices that consumers are setting up in their dens and bedrooms.
These days we are more connected than ever. Smartphones, smart watches, even smart light switches. But how safe are these devices when it comes to your personal privacy?
When you think of your home environment, do you view it as your sanctuary — the place where you feel the most secure and private?
Mirai took advantage of insecure IoT devices in a simple but clever way. It scanned big blocks of the internet for open Telnet ports, then attempted to log in default passwords. In this way, it was able to amass a botnet army.